#4 Edward Roessler

This week I am going to focus on one of my husband’s ancestors, his 3 times great grandfather (on his paternal side) Edward Roessler (I’ll be focusing on his mother at a different date!).

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Edward Roessler and his signature

Edward Roessler was born January 13, 1825 in Lancaster, Ohio and died April 30, 1901 in Shelby, Ohio.  His parents were Christian Roessler (1788-1861) and Dorthea Elizabet Mueller (1799-1871).

On August 5, 1849, Edward Roessler married Anna Stumpf (1831-1914) in Fairfield, Ohio.  Anna was the daughter of Gearhart Stumpf and Catherine Leurs.  Anna was born in Hanover, Germany. I was able to find a record of their marriage written in a book on family search:
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I have also located Edward Roessler and his family on the 1880 census living in Rose Township, Shelby Co., IL.

I found the following information on Mr. Roessler from the “Portrait and Biographical Record of Shelby and Moultrie Counties from 1891.  You can find this book on google books, but I also found it on this other website (Mocavo) which I really liked b/c it typed out all the text underneath the images of the actual book pages.  I also found the above photo of Mr. Roessler in this book.  This is what they had to say about him:

“In this sketch we present to the attention of our readers a short record of the life history of a man who is well known in Shelby County, not only 0n account of his honorable war record, but also as the former representative of this district in the Legislature of the State of Illinois. We also invite the attention of the reader to his portrait on the opposite page. His father, Christian Roessler. was born in Wurtemburg. Germany, and came to America in 1815, re-locating in Lancaster, Fairfield County, Ohio. He learned the trade of a wagon-maker in the Old Country and pursued that business at different places in Europe. A skilled and competent workman, he earned an excellent reputation for thoroughness and efficiency. Upon coming to Lancaster, Ohio, he engaged in business for himself, and his work was noted far and wide for its excellence and completeness. He continued thus employed in Lancaster until 1832, when he sold out and purchased a farm in Fairfield County, where he turned his attention to farming and made it his home until 1849. During the year just mentioned Christian Roessler sold his farm in Ohio and emigrated to Illinois, settling in what is now Rose Township, Shelby County. There he continued to live until his demise, which occurred in September, 1861. His marriage in Lancaster united him with Elizabeth Miller, who was born in Hesse-Cassel, Germany, in the year 1799. She lived until July,1871, when she passed away in Rose Township.  Both Christian Roessler and his wife were earnest in their religious life as members of the Lutheran Church. He ever took an active part in local affairs and was efficient in helping to build the old Indianapolis & St. Louis Railroad when it passed through Shelby County, and was a stockholder in that company. He had a family of four sons and two daughters—Reuben, Edward; Regina, who is the wife of B. Christman; Andrew; Philip, and Elizabeth, who is the wife of Charles Pfeiffer.
Lancaster, Fairfield County, Ohio, is the native town of our subject, who was born January 13, 1825. In that town his early years were passed, and he was about nine years old when his father removed to the farm, where the boy grew to manhood, alternating his attendance at the district school with the healthful pursuits of farm life. He continued to remain at home until he had reached his majority and then enlisted, in 1846, with his brother Reuben, in the United States Army for service in the Mexican War. Edward became a member of Company 15, Fourth Ohio Infantry, and was in service all through the war. The most important engagement in which he took part was the battle of Monterey. He was mustered out of the service at Cincinnati, Ohio, and returned to Lancaster, the same State.

The young man had determined to come West, and in the spring of 1849 he removed to Shelby County, Ill., with his father’s family.  He bought about two hundred and forty acres and his father some five hundred acres, all of it in Rose Township. During the season he set about improving his land and preparing to establish his home in the new country. During the latter part of the summer he returned to the old home in Fairfield County, Ohio, and was there married August 5, 1819, to Anna Stumpf, who was born in Verden, Hanover, Germany, her birth occurring February 14, 1831. She was two years old when she came with her parents to Ohio, her father being Gearhart Stumpf, and her mother’s maiden name being Catherina Luehrs. The mother died of cholera in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1848, and the father did not long tarry, but passed away after reaching Rose Township in 1852.

Mr. and Mrs. Roessler are the parents of twelve children, namely: Reuben, who died in infancy; David, who married Charlotte Wetzel; Solomon, who married Susie Kellogg, and is a military engineer in the Regular Army; Charles, a farmer, who married Emma Wetzel, now deceased; John, who took to wife Anna Harbour and is a professor in Valparaiso Normal School; Anna, now the wife of George Wendling; Amelia (my husband’s ancestor), who married Edward Wagoner; Clara, who is Mrs. Adolph Reiss; Charlotta, the wife of William Zollinger; Minnie, who is engaged in the Hoopeston College, of Hoopeston, Ill., as a teacher of vocal and instrumental music, in which she is very proficient; George and Henry.

On the breaking out of the Civil War Mr. Roessler took an active part in forwarding enlistments, and himself raised an independent company, of which he was commissioned Captain. His company was assigned to the Fifty-fourth Illinois Infantry, and he afterward raised two companies, which were assigned to the same regiment. In consequence of his energy and zeal he filled the office of Colonel, although not regularly commissioned, and remained in that position until he resigned in November, 1862. In the fall of 1870, the subject of this sketch was elected to the Twenty-seventh General Assembly of the State of Illinois. He filled this responsible position with ability and satisfaction to his constituents, and has continued to take an interest in political matters, especially in local movements. He was elected the first Supervisor of Rose Township, after the organization of that township, and served in that capacity for about ten years, and for several years was Chairman of the Board.

Both Mr. and Mrs. Roessler are prominent members of the Lutheran Church and are active workers in its schemes of benevolence. They are liberal contributors to all church purposes and helped generously in the project of constructing a new house of worship. Our subject’s chief business in life has been the pursuit of agriculture and he is now the owner of two hundred and forty acres, upon which he has placed good improvements, including excellent and commodious buildings.”

One thing I really liked about this biographical sketch was that it included views of homesteads in Shelby County. While I was not lucky enough to have one of my husband’s ancestor’s homes shown here, it is still interesting to get an idea of what the houses and land looked like. I do find it interesting how many of my husband’s people come from this area of the world. I have found several family members from there on my husband’s paternal grandmother’s and grandfather’s side. I hope that makes sense!

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I also found the following obituary for Edward Roessler from a genealogy site:

“ROESSLER, Hon. Edward (deceased). – To be great during life is to accomplish much, but to leave behind a memory that is tenderly cherished, and held up to others as an inspiration, is to do more. WHile much is forgiven the dead, and when one if honored either living or dead, and when one if honored from one end of the State to the other, when his public deeds are blazoned upon the pages of history, when he is remembered as a truly noble man, then it is certain that his life was governed by the principles of honor and religious truth, and his family are justified in their appreciation of him and pride in his achievements. The history of Shelby County would not be complete without the mention of the late Hon. Edward Roessler, whose death occurred April 30, 1901. Mr. Roessler was born in Lancaster, Fairfield County, Ohio, January 13, 1825, and there his early years were passed, he being about nine years old when his father moved to the farm where the boy grew to manhood, alternating his attendance at the district school with the healthful pursuit of farm duties. He continued at home until he reached his majority, when he enlisted, in 1846, in the United States Army, for service in the Mexican War. Mr. Roessler became a member of Company B, Fourth Ohio Infantry, and was in service all through the war. The most important engagement in which he participated was the battle of Monterey. He was mustered out of the service at Cincinnati, Ohio, and returned to Lancaster.
Mr. Roessler had determined to come west, and in the spring 1849 he removed to Shelby County, Ill, with his father’s family, and bought 250 acres in Rose Township. He immediately began to cultivate the land, preparing to establish his home upon it. The latter part of the summer he returned to Fairfield County, and was there married, August 5, 1849, to Anna Stumpf. Mr. and Mrs. Roessler became he parents of twelve children.
When the Civil War broke out, Mr. Roessler became very much interested, and took an active part in forwarding the cause, securing many enlistments, and himself raised an independent company, of which he was commissioned Captain. His company was assigned to the Fifty-fourth Illinois Infantry, and he afterwards raised two other companies which were assigned to the same regiment. In consequence of his energy and zeal, he held the rank of Colonel, although not regularly commissioned, and remained in command until November, 1862, when he resigned.
In the fall of 1870, Mr. Roessler was elected the to the Twenty-seventh General Assembly of the State of Illinois, and filled the responsible position with ability and to the satisfaction of all; he continued to take an interest in political matters until his death, especially in local movements. He was elected the first Supervisor of Rose Township, after its organization, and served in that capacity for about ten years, and for several years he was Chairman of the Board. Mr. Roessler was a prominent member of the Lutheran Church, and always took an active part in benevolent enterprises. He was a liberal contributor to all church work, and helped generously in the construction of a new house of worship. While his principal occupation was that of a farmer, Mr. Roessler was interested in many things, and was always extremely public-spirited. His death was felt to be a public calamity, and his loss was deeply felt throughout the county where he was so well known. In his home circle he was still more keenly missed, and his memory is tenderly cherished by his children and grandchildren, who honor his name and feel proud that they spring from one who never neglected a duty, or failed a friend, who was a good citizen, a brave soldier, and always stood ready to serve his country in either war or peace.”

And, finally a page about Edward Roessler:
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2 thoughts on “#4 Edward Roessler

  1. Pingback: 52 Ancestors: Week 4 Recap | No Story Too Small

  2. I was so excited to see another ROESSLER on Amy Johnson Crow’s 52 Ancestors round up! Excellent post, how lucky to have found those biographical sketches and photos! Unfortunately, if our Roesslers connect, it’s back in the Old Country. My husband’s original Roessler, Christ (full first name unknown) Roessler, came over around 1850 or so, and settled in Pittsburgh, PA with descendants focused in Pittsburgh, Marion (Indiana), and Zanesville (Ohio). He was my first entry for 52ancestors.

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