#17 Hallie Pauline Covington {52 Ancestors}

It’s been a busy few weeks as my daughter’s school year comes to a close and we are starting to spend a lot more time outside enjoying the beautiful weather!  So I will be playing catch up these next few posts as I’m a few weeks behind now on the 52 Acnestor’s challenge.

 

 photo HalliePauline1.jpg

This post will be about my maternal great grandmother Hallie Pauline Mills.  She was born in Bozimar, Alabama on August 16, 1883 to Edward Lee Covington (1857-1935) and Mary Louisa Oswalt (1862-1943).  I wrote about Edward Lee Covington’s mother Mary Ann in a previous post.  I also wrote about my grandmother Sadie (her daughter) in this post.

 photo mygreatgrandma.jpg

Hallie on the far left at about 8-10 years old with her younger sister Louise and an unknown baby (possibly the 4th child who was not alive by the 1900 census.

I have found record of 16 year old Hallie on the 1900 census in Jackson, MI living with her parents.  Originally Hallie was one of 4 children, but by 1900 only two were still alive.  Her sister Louise who was born in 1888.  I do know that Hallies’s brother, Francis, was killed when he was thrown from a horse, he was only 12 years old.

 photo HallieandSidney.jpg

Hallie and Sidney

On March 2, 1904, at the age of 20, Hallie married Sidney Franklin Mills (1879-1941) who was 24 at the time of their marriage.  They were married in New Augusta, MS and then lived in Hintonville, MS.  They purchased a stove and bed on credit and borrowed dishes from family and friends.

He was a turpentine man so the family moved around a lot.  In the 1910’s, Hallie lived on the farm while Sidney was living and working elsewhere 15 miles away.  They called the farm “Camp 1” and Sidney was at “Camp 3” and many weekly letters were sent back and forth between the two.  She talked in her letters about how life on the farm was going and how she was feeling.  She described herself as a “hustler” and kept careful records of expenditures, had enormous scrapbooks of recipes and household hints, made the children’s clothing, and was the first in the community to have an “Edison talking machine!”

 photo kids-1.jpg

Hallie and Sidney had 6 children shown above (taken around 1917 or so)

back left to right:
Sadie (my grandmother), Edward (Buddy), Helen

front:
Frank (Sidney Franklin Jr.), Gladys, Hallie

 photo HalliePaulineunknownBuddyHallieFrankSidneyHelenSadie.jpg

This photo shows Hallie, Miss Arroyo (the school teacher), Edward, Hallie, Frank Burton Core the school clerk, Gladys, Hellen, Sadie

In 1916 on July 30 Hallie Pauline passed away.  Just months after the photo above was taken and only a few weeks before her 34th birthday.  At the time of her death her children ranged in ages from 2-11 years old.  My grandmother was only 6 and a half when her mother died.  She died of an infection (possibly after an operation in a hospital) before penicillin was discovered.  At the time of her death they owned a 160 acre farm, country store, grist mill and also had running water in their house, store, and barn.
One last photo of Hallie:
 photo maybehalliepauline.jpg

 

Sidney re-married at some point after Hallie’s death to a woman named Francis.  My grandmother dearly loved her step mother and called her miss Francis.  miss Frances and Sidney had 5 more children together.

Some scrapbook pages for Hallie Covington:
 photo mary-HalliePauline.jpg

 photo mary-HalliePaulineletters.jpg

 photo mary-HalliePaulinetext.jpg

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One thought on “#17 Hallie Pauline Covington {52 Ancestors}

  1. Pingback: 52 Ancestors Challenge: Week 20 Recap | No Story Too Small

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